Parson Russell Terrier Club Nederland

Erkend door de Raad van Beheer op Kynologisch Gebied in Nederland sinds 1992

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Coat care

The coat

Starting from the primal dog, the wolf, a dog should shed twice a year. In the winter in cold weather the dog has a thick winter coat, while in the summer the dog has the thinner summer coat. The climate also influences the structure of the coat. The shedding of every dog ​​has to do with temperature and light.

Since humans have started to keep the dog as a use and pet, this statement is no longer valid in some cases. A dog from the far north could not settle in terms of fur in Africa, nor vice versa. The way in which the dog is kept, at home or in the kennel, clearly has to do with the shedding and the extent to which the dog sheds.

Through the ages, humans have "created" different races. As a result, different types of fur have emerged: smooth hair, rough hair, curly curly hair, silk hair, long hair, felt hair and even dogs without hair (think of the Mexican hairless dog). There is a breed standard for every breed. It states how the hair should be. For the Parson Russell Terrier, that is smooth, broken-coated or rough-haired.

Brokencoated is a smooth, dense undercoat with longer coarse hair as an outer coat, especially on the back, which is usually easy to trim twice a year. When trimming (plucking) the fur, you work easiest from the front to the back. You hold the part of the skin that you want to pluck tight with one hand and with the other hand you take some hair (small tufts at a time) between your thumb and forefinger, and with a twisting motion (as if you were peeling potatoes) you give short jerks . Work with the direction of the hair. When the hair is well ripe, the dog does not feel it and often finds it pleasant. So-called money counters can be purchased at the office bookstore. These are rubber caps with studs that you can put on your thumb and forefinger. A trimming knife can also be used. Of course no sharp trimmes, this would cut the hair and that is not the intention, since the dead hair must be removed in its entirety!

A rubber curry comb or rubber glove can offer a solution for the smooth-haired dog during its molting period. Start picking the rough hair early, this will benefit the coat later.

Also start getting used to the dog early to stand on a table and be combed, especially if you plan to pick the dog yourself. This prevents wrestling parties with an unwilling dog, which is a disastrous sight for both parties. Put a rubber mat on the table to prevent slipping. It is advisable to work with a table to prevent unnecessary bending. The dog is also often quieter on a table.

Trim Schedule:

  1. The back is plucked completely smooth with thumb and forefinger. If this does not work, you can use a (not sharp) trimmer. (see image 1)
  2. Pick the neck, front chest and shoulders completely smooth. (see image 2)
  3. The head must be plucked smoothly. Leave some beard and eyebrow. (see image 3)
  4. The ears are plucked completely smooth on the inside and outside. The ear edges are trimmed. (see image 4)
  5. Pick the tail smoothly. If this does not work, you can use the efiling scissors (do not do this just before a show!). If the tail is too short, keep the tip a bit longer. (see image 5)
  6. Pick long hair away from the front and back legs. Pay particular attention to the "front knee", because there is usually more hair there. The legs must be completely smooth, without flag or other wallpaper. (see Figure 6)
  7. The feet are cut around and the hairs between the soles are cut away. The Parson Russell Terrier has a closed cat foot. (see Figure 7)
  8. All protruding hairs are plucked away from the abdomen. (see Figure 8)
  9. Finally, eyebrows and mustaches need to be adjusted. (see Figure 9)

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trimschema

Source: Helmi Mutter

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